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Easton_Livingston

Calling Independent Self-published Authors

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11 minutes ago, lynnmosher said:

Oh, wow! I didn't read through it. Just glanced at it so I didn't see the typos. That's not good at all.

 

"this is how self-publsihng a book done right from scratch."

I stopped reading after that (so-called) sentence. Wow, that's embarrassing.¬†¬†ūüė©

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I'm a Technical Writer for my day job. I work with people we refer to as SMEs, Subject Matter Experts. I've learned that many of the people who are the most technically accurate are also the least grammatically careful. (I'm not complaining - this explains how I can get paid to do what I do.) I've learned to accept spelling and grammatical errors as long as the content is correct. (Also, I frequently work with people for whom English is not their first language. It would be churlish of me to chastise people who are trying their best but didn't learn to use as many articles as I do, so I take the content provided and craft it into something which is publishable.)

In other words, if the content is good, I'll look the other way if I run into spelling or grammatical errors along the way. In this case, I think this Inforgraphic does a decent job at a high level overview and accept the typos as someone who might know their stuff but who didn't pay close enough attention to their writing.

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Good point, Phy. Thanks so much for adding that. Yes, as my first view of the graphic, it was a good list of the process, though not complete. But it does help those who are new and need to know the basics of this list. :)

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Lol. I agree with @Phy. I was not aware of the typos there too. The point was that experienced people here should, say, list the self-publishing steps somewhere and discuss them before pinning it for newbies... instead of referring them to articles. Too much reading for newbs is not quite interesting. You wouldn't like to answer the same questions over and over again, would you?  

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2 hours ago, Phy said:

In other words, if the content is good, I'll look the other way if I run into spelling or grammatical errors along the way.ÔĽŅ

 

I used to be much easier on material with typos and grammatical errors. Then I became a writer. My standards had to be significantly raised because people who pay for my work expect a level of quality that goes well beyond good content. If I consider myself a professional, I must produce professional grade material. Readers might not like my story, which won't bother me nearly as much as when they don't like it because of too many typos, poor grammar, or bad formatting. I think those types of errors reflect laziness.

 

As for the errors on that self-publishing guide, it¬†gets me irritated because it's supposed to be a¬†guide to self-publishing, but immediately falls flat on its face with numerous errors under¬†the opening banner¬†. ūüė¨¬†It only reinforces a widespread, long-held notion that self-published material is inferior.¬†¬†

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Just now, Accord64 said:

It only reinforces a widespread, long-held notion that self-published material is inferior.  

Exactly!!!

 

"Want to now how to self-pubblishh? Reed my guide and folllow these steppes." Uh, no.

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3 hours ago, euggio said:

Too much reading for newbs is not quite interesting. You wouldn't like to answer the same questions over and over again, would you? 

 

Ahhh, but we do! Newbies join the site all the time and we go through the same questions and answers time and again. Newbies do need to read...a lot, whether it's interesting or not. There is a huge learning curve to writing, publishing, marketing, platform, social media, blogging/website, etc. And it changes. So reading and learning never stops. :)

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Lest we lose the point, I'm just saying as a writer and editor for a long, long time, I don't immediately discount the accuracy of information just because there might be some typos. I know too many really smart people who really don't grok spelling / grammar to immediately discount something with some typos. (This has to do with non-fiction online such as this infographic - I have rather less patience for fiction which, one presumes, has been more rigorously vetted.)

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Okay, I will forget the typos for now. Let's look at what this infographic says and judge it on the merits of the text.

 

It's just too facile and indicates to me that this person has never self-published themselves or done their research to learn from those who have done it.

  • The selection of steps is odd. How can "choose a title" and "secure copyright" be given the same weight and column space as "marketing"?
  • Their description of "printing your book" makes it sound like it's telling people to run copies off their home printer. Nothing is said about the printing options that self-publishers actually use.
  • And what about this gem of advice about making an ebook: "it does not take much of your investment for your book. It is only a little extra effort and besides, business online is now a trend."
  • Scrolling further down, the source for their information is cited as wikihow.com. With the tons of advice out there from successful self-published writers, they've gone to wikihow and aren't ashamed to say so.

I think this is an instance where the sloppy editing reveals the dodgy quality of the content itself.

 

The one good thing about it is that it's pretty to look at and if you don't actually read it, it's attractive.

 

Editing to add: I hope I'm not coming across as combative. But, surely, we are here to help each other strive for quality and excellence. I think part of that process should include vetting and discussing the merits of the information that we find out on the web.

Edited by EBraten
I was sounding like a meanie

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On 11/1/2018 at 4:06 PM, Accord64 said:

As for the errors on that self-publishing guide, it¬†gets me irritated because it's supposed to be a¬†guide to self-publishing, but immediately falls flat on its face with numerous errors under¬†the opening banner¬†. ūüė¨¬†It only reinforces a widespread, long-held notion that self-published material is inferior.¬†¬†

2

 

Good grief. Talk about hitting the nail on the head. Kudos. I holehartedly uhgree. :)

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Though this should go without saying, if you're going to self-publish, you need to have a website. This is a given. However, for many, this may be a daunting endeavor. So, I thought this may help some along who may be stuck on how to go about it.

 

Enjoy and learn. All the best. God bless.

 

 

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On 11/1/2018 at 1:06 PM, Accord64 said:

As for the errors on that self-publishing guide, it gets me irritated because it's supposed to be a guide to self-publishing, but immediately falls flat on its face with numerous errors


Probably a minor point here, but: If I should hire a vendor to print my book, I don't particularly care about their writing or grammar. I care about their printing skills.
.

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2 hours ago, Steven Hutson said:

I care about their printing skills.

Are you trying to pick an argument today?  Is everything ok with you?  Anything we can pray about to help?  

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1 hour ago, Alley said:

Are you trying to pick an argument today? 


Nope. 

Most self-pub deals are just glorified print shops. It doesn't matter if they can spell or punctuate, because that job belongs to you.

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9 minutes ago, Steven Hutson said:

It doesn't matter if they can spell or punctuate, because that job belongs to you.

 

Sorry. It means I don't do business with them. I don't care what a site, company, or person is selling, if their grammar and punctuation are out of whack, I look for someone who is a professional and shows it by their use of the English language.

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