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Teddy

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Images are highly important and getting more so. Hope this helps everyone. :)

 

The last critique I received on my blog was "Not enough pictures" and I had one on every single post plus the main page. I think it was an issue for the reader because my posts are generally between 500 - 1100 words and they aren't used to reading that without visual breaks. I don't have it in me to dig up 3 pics per post (especially since I'm not an artist), but I can't disagree that it would certainly improve the overall look and flow.

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Here's some general advice: 1) be sure you have a picture of yourself in your sidebar at the top. Readers like to know who is writing what they're reading, 2) be sure to have a subscription box and set up an email service, 3) be sure to have a picture in your header, and 4) be sure to have a picture for each post. Images are highly important and getting more so. Hope this helps everyone. :)

Will do when I get home on the laptop

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The last critique I received on my blog was "Not enough pictures" and I had one on every single post plus the main page. I think it was an issue for the reader because my posts are generally between 500 - 1100 words and they aren't used to reading that without visual breaks. I don't have it in me to dig up 3 pics per post (especially since I'm not an artist), but I can't disagree that it would certainly improve the overall look and flow.

 

Oh, I'm with you, Hucklebarry. The thing is, on those sites that use several images in a post, the images have nothing to do with the post. I use one at the top. Unless, for some reason, the post requires more. :rolleyes:

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Just thought of a few other things.

 

1) Don't make your paragraphs too long.

2) Be sure to leave space between paragraphs. Eyes need white space to rest.

3) Highlight a portion of several paragraphs. I sometimes highlight the beginning sentence of a paragraph or a portion of it. And highlight every other paragraph or every third one. Or however you like.

4) If you use Scripture, be sure to take out the verse numbers and use not only the verse reference but the Bible version as well.

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Here's some general advice: 1) be sure you have a picture of yourself in your sidebar at the top. Readers like to know who is writing what they're reading, 2) be sure to have a subscription box and set up an email service, 3) be sure to have a picture in your header, and 4) be sure to have a picture for each post. Images are highly important and getting more so. Hope this helps everyone. :)

O.o does it have to be an actual picture or can it be my minion. LOL :D

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You're welcome! Always glad to help out. One other thing that helps is to visit others' sites, especially if you have a writer's site (one not necessarily for nonfiction/devotionals etc). You can learn a lot just by seeing what others are doing. One caveat: not everyone does it right. ;):rolleyes:

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Yay! Now just move it to the top of the sidebar. At some point, you will need one that's a little more professional looking. But this is fine for now. :)

Aww man. All this professionalism stuff even when I'm not at work. :) Okay, it makes sense.

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Nicholas, that looks very nice! Now all you need is a picture of yourself. :)

Since my experiments in London, dealing with the translucent properties of water and silvering, I do not photograph well.:D

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The whole issue of getting oneself heard in an age of hypercommunication has preoccupied me a great deal. Everybody can produce an acceptable quality ebook free of charge. Everybody can create and maintain a blog, website, a Facebook, Twitter and Youtube account equally free of charge. As a result there are far, far too many words going around.

 

The internet is in fact becoming an extension of normal everyday verbal conversation: since everybody can talk, one can get the attention only of the few people one has real business with - family, friends, work colleagues, etc. It is socially unacceptable to, say, telephone total strangers and say you are a writer and would they like to see your work?

 

So how do you get noticed by the crowd? Answer IMHO is you don't, not really. If you want to reach a lot of people you have to get yourself onto the big platforms - i.e. publishing houses - who act as filters for their readership, offering and recommending books likely to interest them from the vast reservoir of hopeful writers.

 

There's something of a square circle here: publishers want authors with an established readership, but few authors are able to create that readership without the platform publishers offer, so publishers prefer already-published authors and are sceptical about new, untried writers. But they have to take new writers on board eventually, so how do they select them? My own take is that it depends to a large extent on luck - competent writing plus a literary agent's opinion that this book has something fresh that might appeal to its intended readership. But there's no formula that guarantees the book will actually take off, and literary agents and publishers actually have no idea whether a book will bomb or not (see how many rejections classics initially got). They have to act on a hunch and cross fingers.

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The whole issue of getting oneself heard in an age of hypercommunication has preoccupied me a great deal. Everybody can produce an acceptable quality ebook free of charge. Everybody can create and maintain a blog, website, a Facebook, Twitter and Youtube account equally free of charge. As a result there are far, far too many words going around.

 

The internet is in fact becoming an extension of normal everyday verbal conversation: since everybody can talk, one can get the attention only of the few people one has real business with - family, friends, work colleagues, etc. It is socially unacceptable to, say, telephone total strangers and say you are a writer and would they like to see your work?

 

So how do you get noticed by the crowd? Answer IMHO is you don't, not really. If you want to reach a lot of people you have to get yourself onto the big platforms - i.e. publishing houses - who act as filters for their readership, offering and recommending books likely to interest them from the vast reservoir of hopeful writers.

 

There's something of a square circle here: publishers want authors with an established readership, but few authors are able to create that readership without the platform publishers offer, so publishers prefer already-published authors and are sceptical about new, untried writers. But they have to take new writers on board eventually, so how do they select them? My own take is that it depends to a large extent on luck - competent writing plus a literary agent's opinion that this book has something fresh that might appeal to its intended readership. But there's no formula that guarantees the book will actually take off, and literary agents and publishers actually have no idea whether a book will bomb or not (see how many rejections classics initially got). They have to act on a hunch and cross fingers.

Umm something to seriously think about.

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Just thought of a few other things.

 

 

4) If you use Scripture, be sure to take out the verse numbers and use not only the verse reference but the Bible version as well.

Lynn, I'm not sure what you mean here. "...take out the verse numbers...use not only the verse reference, but the Bible version as well." Can you unpack that a bit? It seems contradictory, in my mind.
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