An interesting comment from my editor.

Johne

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2005
3,942
2,123
Wow, this sounds amazing! I would love to participate this November. How much does it cost, or is it free?
Totally free except for the time you spend writing. You can order a t-shirt when you finish (I have two).
There are lots of writers here who compete every year. You can sign up at nanowrimo.org and then share your progress here.
 

Nehemiah

Active Member
Oct 2, 2022
197
128
Totally free except for the time you spend writing. You can order a t-shirt when you finish (I have two).
There are lots of writers here who compete every year. You can sign up at nanowrimo.org and then share your progress here.
Thank you so much. I think I'm gonna do this and I'll be sure to share my progress as I go. Wish me luck. :)
 

Johne

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2005
3,942
2,123
Speaking of feeling like an imposter, Shawn Coyne talks about that in a video this week here. I skipped ahead to the exact spot where Shawn begins talking about two broad kinds of stories, the 'fish out of water' story, or the 'indigenous member of the pond.' In THE BLUE GOLEM, Clay is a fish out of water. In coming stories he'll be an indigenous member of the pond. These are universal themes that everyone resonates with to some degree.
 

Nehemiah

Active Member
Oct 2, 2022
197
128
Should I send out a request on here for writing partners? Or should I find random people on the NaNo site?
 

Johne

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2005
3,942
2,123
Should I send out a request on here for writing partners? Or should I find random people on the NaNo site?
I'd do both. ;) As we get closer to November, you can put out a ping for those taking part here, and you can also go to the forums at NaNo and find others writing in the genre you plan to tackle, or those close to where you live, or both.
 

Nehemiah

Active Member
Oct 2, 2022
197
128
Okay, thanks. Also, should I be planning the novel out beforehand or starting from scratch on November 1st?
 

Johne

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2005
3,942
2,123
Okay, thanks. Also, should I be planning the novel out beforehand or starting from scratch on November 1st?
I think it doesn't hurt to have a rough idea of your genre, your cast, your setting, but other than that, I'd wing it on day-of so you have maximum enthusiasm going into the project.
 

Johne

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 27, 2005
3,942
2,123
Here's what I wrote on November 1st, 2004. You will observe this isn't great work–that's not the point. The POV wanders all over the place, there's a lot of Telling rather than Showing, it's a glorious mess from stem-to-stern. But the big thing to keep in mind for NaNo is wordcount, wordcount, wordcount. This is that one place where 1000 bad words is better than 100 good ones. At midnight on November 1st, I put my crew in a situation, I got them yakking at each other, and then I pulled a cool reveal and called it a night. It's not great fiction, but it wrote itself, and that's what you want for this exercise, a story you can tell without editing that just pours out onto the page.

You can fix it later (or not) but the point is to write as fast and as much as you can and cross that 50k mark by midnight, December 1st.
Again, this is a mess. But you can see that I was having fun with the scenario. In my head I was trying to do just two things: introduce the crew, and introduce the ship.

This is what I wrote nearly 20 years ago, the first scene from a story I came to refer to as THE ADVENTURES OF THE SKY PIRATE.

"It was a moonlit night, and magic was in the air," whispered Eggplant nervously as he crouched behind the barrels with the others.

"Ssh," Bola said, trying to look around under the canvas awning that stretched over them on the shadowed dock.

"He speaks in the third person when he's nervous," explained Eggplant of himself, helpfully.

"He's going to get his tongue pinned to the dock if he keeps making noise, isn't that right, Coop," murmured Bola, drawing a wicked big knife to demonstrate her point.

"It's 'Captain Flynn' to you," said 1st Seaman Karver Humble, who was already taken with his new title.

"This will be a short trip to a dark cell if you don't put that shiny blade away," whispered Chain, who had no use for titles, himself. He worked on what appeared to be a leather backpack, comfortable working entirely by feel in the shadows on the docks.

Mr. Pitt said nothing, as usual. A Reacher by birth, he was a full head taller than Bola, who was herself something of an amazon. Mr. Pitt was broad of chest and wide of shoulders, and was the most legitimate person of the crew, coming within mere moments of gaining graduation from the Hadirron Naval Academy. He was content to remain passive and relaxed while he crouched next to the object of the discussion.

Cooper Flynn was a trim, powerful young man. His black hair was pulled back and tied in a knot, completely out of fashion with the wigs of Her Majesty's Navy. As newly-elected captain of their little venture, Cooper Flynn couldn't care less about titles as long as he got what he'd come here for, the ship retrofitted to his specifications by the Navy itself without direct knowledge of the project, the ship stolen out from under him by Welston Dananstrogh, Her Majesty's Auditor. They knew the Navy couldn't have taken the ship very far, and here she was, waiting for reinforcements.

It was now or never, and Flynn didn't like to lose.

"You have the sword?" asked Chain.

Flynn patted his sheath. "Right here. You sure this thing works?"

Chain shrugged. "It's from Menorra. It costs more than my entire shop, or would if I actually bought it. It better work."

"Where's this flappin' ship," hissed Bola, turning around to grouse to the little band. It was clear that the dock where they expected to find the tethered shape of the HMS Majeste was vacant, and yet the distant sound of fiddle music teased the small band. "I've been waiting six months for this. I'm here to pinch a ship and I don't see my payday."

"Patience, Bola. You'll get your payday. You waited six months, just wait one more minute," murmured the Captain as he faced her, "To answer your question, in this case, it's to your starboard."

"What's starboard," she said, spinning in place, looking around for the ship.

Flynn touched her right shoulder. "Starboard is to your right. And it looks like Eggplant was right--magic is in the air." And then he pointed to the ship.

Not out, but up.

As one, they leaned out from under the tarp and looked up. Eggplant began a low whistle which was abruptly silenced by Pitt's gently firm hand over his mouth, but it summed up the moment.

They all followed the tether rope up to see the ship silhouetted against the moonlit sky floating one hundred feet in the air above the quiet port of Bitten Bay.
 

Nehemiah

Active Member
Oct 2, 2022
197
128
Here's what I wrote on November 1st, 2004. You will observe this isn't great work–that's not the point. The POV wanders all over the place, there's a lot of Telling rather than Showing, it's a glorious mess from stem-to-stern. But the big thing to keep in mind for NaNo is wordcount, wordcount, wordcount. This is that one place where 1000 bad words is better than 100 good ones. At midnight on November 1st, I put my crew in a situation, I got them yakking at each other, and then I pulled a cool reveal and called it a night. It's not great fiction, but it wrote itself, and that's what you want for this exercise, a story you can tell without editing that just pours out onto the page.

You can fix it later (or not) but the point is to write as fast and as much as you can and cross that 50k mark by midnight, December 1st.
Again, this is a mess. But you can see that I was having fun with the scenario. In my head I was trying to do just two things: introduce the crew, and introduce the ship.

This is what I wrote nearly 20 years ago, the first scene from a story I came to refer to as THE ADVENTURES OF THE SKY PIRATE.
That's actually pretty good! I can see what you mean about it being a little rough around the edges, but it was still great. To think I'm reading something you wrote twenty years ago, wow! No wonder you have a job in the book industry. I hope I can come with something as good as this. I mean I've written three books, ninety thousand words apiece, but to get fifty thousand in one month? This will be a challenge, but I'm up for it. Thanks for telling me about it.
 

Crawdad

Active Member
Feb 10, 2022
136
161
Hopefully as I write more, I'll grow more confident. I really love writing, in fact, that's why I'm in college, so maybe I just need more time writing, publishing, and receiving feedback.

I keep hearing about NaNoWriMo; what is it exactly?
My oldest son encouraged me to join him in a NaNoWriMo a couple of years ago. At the time, I was deep into my first book and about halfway finished with my second book. So I skipped ahead to the third book in the series which I had not started. We spent a week or so talking it over and making very simple outline notes for the "books" we wanted to write. At the ringing bell of November 1, we hit the keyboards with flying fingers. I made up character names on the spot...if I needed a welder..."Hello my name is John...Welder." Main characters probably changed names, hair colors, and physical descriptions at least three times each. It took commitment, but it was so worth it to me. At the end of the month, I think I ended up with 52K chaotic words towards my 85K target on book 3. I enjoyed it because it allowed me to spontaneously and creatively slam words down without getting bogged by all the structure details. I am not familiar with any type of "competition" involved. For my son and I, it was simply a personal challenge. I encourage you to give it a try!
 

Nehemiah

Active Member
Oct 2, 2022
197
128
I've already submitted a title to the NaNoWriMo challenge and am signed up to participate. Man, I can't wait. Also, I found someone as a writing budy on there too, so we're helping each other out. I'll do what you said about sending out a plug here when it gets closer to the time.
My oldest son encouraged me to join him in a NaNoWriMo a couple of years ago. At the time, I was deep into my first book and about halfway finished with my second book. So I skipped ahead to the third book in the series which I had not started. We spent a week or so talking it over and making very simple outline notes for the "books" we wanted to write. At the ringing bell of November 1, we hit the keyboards with flying fingers. I made up character names on the spot...if I needed a welder..."Hello my name is John...Welder." Main characters probably changed names, hair colors, and physical descriptions at least three times each. It took commitment, but it was so worth it to me. At the end of the month, I think I ended up with 52K chaotic words towards my 85K target on book 3. I enjoyed it because it allowed me to spontaneously and creatively slam words down without getting bogged by all the structure details. I am not familiar with any type of "competition" involved. For my son and I, it was simply a personal challenge. I encourage you to give it a try!
Thanks and I signed up for it already. I can't wait! I'll be asking around on this site before long, seeing if anybody is interested in writing with me. Maybe you would be interested?
 

Crawdad

Active Member
Feb 10, 2022
136
161
I've already submitted a title to the NaNoWriMo challenge and am signed up to participate. Man, I can't wait. Also, I found someone as a writing budy on there too, so we're helping each other out. I'll do what you said about sending out a plug here when it gets closer to the time.

Thanks and I signed up for it already. I can't wait! I'll be asking around on this site before long, seeing if anybody is interested in writing with me. Maybe you would be interested?
I might! Let me think and pray about it. This Oct/Nov are involving some large life changes, so it's possible that I am fooling myself to think I can do it this year. :eek:(
 

Nehemiah

Active Member
Oct 2, 2022
197
128
I might! Let me think and pray about it. This Oct/Nov are involving some large life changes, so it's possible that I am fooling myself to think I can do it this year. :eek:(
Just give me a shout if you can. In a week or two, I'll post a thread asking people if they are willing to write with me. I hope you can, and I'll be praying for whatever changes you are about to go through.
 

carolinamtne

Well-known member
Aug 10, 2013
9,331
3,585
So mathematically, 50,000 words in 30 days is 1667 words a day, more if you take off a day (like Sunday, or Saturday as John did). In theory, I could do that. Maybe I could expand one of my Bible stories. I'd already have an outline.

So I'm thinking about it.
 

Nehemiah

Active Member
Oct 2, 2022
197
128
So mathematically, 50,000 words in 30 days is 1667 words a day, more if you take off a day (like Sunday, or Saturday as John did). In theory, I could do that. Maybe I could expand one of my Bible stories. I'd already have an outline.

So I'm thinking about it.
You should! I think it would be awesome. Plus, you already have an outline so you may as well.

What kind of Bible story is this, if you don't mind me asking?
 

Nehemiah

Active Member
Oct 2, 2022
197
128
Speaking of feeling like an imposter, Shawn Coyne talks about that in a video this week here. I skipped ahead to the exact spot where Shawn begins talking about two broad kinds of stories, the 'fish out of water' story, or the 'indigenous member of the pond.' In THE BLUE GOLEM, Clay is a fish out of water. In coming stories he'll be an indigenous member of the pond. These are universal themes that everyone resonates with to some degree.
I watched the part of the video you linked me to, and it was great. I can really relate with a lot of what they were talking about. The feeling of giving up one of the guys expressed when his work keeps getting critiqued and turning out unsatisfactory; I can really relate to that. Sometimes in the past, I've had to force myself to write, even when I felt like it was hopeless. Looking back, I'm thankful for those moments. Shortly after, I always had a breakthrough moment, like Shawn was talking about. Helplessness precedes success, I guess you could say. Although not always.

Thanks for showing me this. I really appreciate it.
 

carolinamtne

Well-known member
Aug 10, 2013
9,331
3,585
What kind of Bible story is this, if you don't mind me asking?
The first book is 26 stories based Old Testament people. I have "filled in the blanks" in places where the Scriptures don't. How did Cain find a wife? What happened after Noah and family left the ark? How did Isaac feel after the sacrifice? Moses, Elijah, and more.
 

Nehemiah

Active Member
Oct 2, 2022
197
128
The first book is 26 stories based Old Testament people. I have "filled in the blanks" in places where the Scriptures don't. How did Cain find a wife? What happened after Noah and family left the ark? How did Isaac feel after the sacrifice? Moses, Elijah, and more.
That sounds super cool. I always enjoy reading stories based on the Bible and I think taking liberties with the text is perfectly fine when done in a fictional setting. I'd love to read it sometime.
 
Top