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yowordworm

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  1. I just read Finding Faith by Denise Hunter, a popular CF romance writer. In one scene, we switch from the woman's POV to the man's in the middle of the scene. The woman says something and feels guilty. Then we switch and see the man thinking she must be lying. I don't know what the experts say about it, but I see this switch in the middle of scenes a lot. I think the authors do it so the reader can see the same scene from different POVs. I'm not saying it's the best thing to do, but plenty of popular modern romance authors switch POVs in the middle of scenes, going from the woman's POV to the man's. This often happens about once a scene, but usually not more than once. This is a change I've noticed recently in romance fiction. It doesn't really happen in older novels. In some ways this makes sense when you think of how we're trained by film to see things from different POVs as the scenes take place. I've actually come to expect it from romance authors and am sometimes disappointed when it doesn't.
  2. Maybe it depends on genre? I actually see this a lot, especially in romance novels. It's pretty common in romance for the POV to switch between characters in the middle of chapters, even in the middle of scenes. I'm bothered by it if it happens every few paragraphs, but if the changes are spaced out well, it doesn't bother me at all and can, in my opinion, add depth to the story. That is if it's in third person. If it's in first person, I get tripped up even when the changes happen at the beginning of a chapter. First person POV changes drive me crazy!
  3. The first part of your question seems to be about whether Christians are okay with playing Bingo. I grew up in a super conservative Christian community (We were Mennonite.), and Bingo was viewed much the same as gambling. I don't know all the whys of it, just that no one would ever play Bingo. So not all Christians are okay with Bingo, but it seems, from all the other responses, that by and large, Bingo is considered okay to most Christians.
  4. I'd be willing to skip NaNoWriMo this year if it meant I got to travel with the 11th doctor! Besides, he could always bring me back to a few minutes after I left, so I wouldn't even have to skip.
  5. Most Popular Baby Girl names 1880-2019 Just in case anyone wants to know what the most popular girls names were in different time periods. And because I found it fascinating how long Mary held on to the top spot. And I also realized just why my name (Ruth) often reminds people of their grandmothers.
  6. I agree with Nicholas. A nine-year-old boy would probably just call it brown. However, if he's an observant sort of boy, he might compare the brown to something else in his life (the same brown as a his favorite caramel that sticks in his teeth or like the acorns he uses in his slingshot, etc.).
  7. I often do this for my main characters. I also found it really helpful to read about how the different personality types interact. Most of what I read made perfect sense for my characters and helped me flesh out their conflicts a bit more.
  8. You could also look up the meanings of the names you have and choose one that fits who your character is. For example, Aspen is the name of a tree that is described as having leaves that flutter in the breeze. (I know this because I have a character named Aspen.) The aspen tree is significant in Celtic mythology and associated with the wind, communication, resurrection, and rebirth. All of these things went into my choice to name her Aspen. This usually helps me choose a name when the name eludes me, and it helps with developing the character. Sometimes, I think of who the character's parents are and how they would have chosen a name. For example, one of my characters got her name from a city that was special to her parents. Parents also name children after family members or people they admire, and names also vary depending on the time period and region. Names say a lot about where and who a character comes from. For example, when I think of parents who name their daughter Evelyn (one of your choices), I think of people who like classic, elegant names, while parents who name their daughter Phoenix are probably edgier and value uniqueness, and parents who name their daughter Honey probably like the cute, sweetness factor.
  9. For me as a reader, I don't want a cliffhanger at the end of every scene or chapter. It drives me nuts. Sometimes is okay. Sometimes is good. But if an author puts a cliffhanger at the end of every chapter, I get really annoyed and feel like the author is relying too much on cliffhangers and not the general interest and complexity of the plot to keep me reading. I have been known to stop reading in the middle of a chapter (gasp!) just to avoid the predictable and inevitable cliffhanger at the end of the chapter.
  10. To me, this sounds like your friend is getting mixed up between past and passive. Past happenings aren't less active than present happenings. They just happened at a different time. If a flashback seems less active (or more passive), then I think there's probably something going on with the writing style of the flashback. I suppose if a writer has more flashback than anything else, he probably needs to start the story at a different point, but I've often seen flashbacks used very effectively. One result of putting the reader into the middle of the action right away (something that feels very active to the reader) requires that you include some flashback to show readers what led to that action. Otherwise, you'd have to start stories with information dumps to bring readers up to speed before the action begins.
  11. I just got this one this summer, primarily because my characters seemed to nod their head a lot. I've enjoyed looking through it but haven't really delved deeply yet.
  12. Currently, I'm writing contemporary fiction, but I've also got a few fantasy novels floating around in my head too. One year, I asked for, and received, a pack of those 5x8, 100-page journals/notebooks, and they were one of my favorite gifts. I go through those like they're going out of style. They're just so portable, and I don't feel like I have to fill them with lofty thoughts like I do a regular journal. But I'm also interested in books about writing that others have found useful.
  13. I'm currently in the process of writing my Christmas wish list (My family likes to get started early.) and need suggestions for writing resources to add to the list. What writing resources would you recommend?
  14. I think this depends heavily on genre. For example, in romance, while the antagonist is sometimes a rival lover, the real and most difficult conflict is often internal (man vs. self). So the antagonist and the protagonist are the same person (or internal forces within the same person). I don't think it's always a matter of creating an external villain to be vanquished, but seeing what the conflicts have in common to see if the real antagonist is internal (self) or external (like nature). You may find that all the conflicts you've created point to one of these antagonists. If that's the case, it may be a matter of playing up the antagonist that's already there in the conflicts you've created.
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