CZRatliff

What Language Was Spoken And Written Before The Flood?

13 posts in this topic

I am working on a novel that will reference pre-flood written word. Would it have been one of the Semitic languages like Hebrew? How would they have written? Would they have used the Cuneiform script thought to have originally developed by the Sumerians circa 3500 BC?

Thanks for any ideas.

CZ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many assume the original language was Hebrew. That makes sense, but no one knows.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

David,

Thanks for your input. I assume Hebrew, although it might have been written in a different fashion.

I looked up your books on Amazon. Several of them really caught my attention. The fictional novel Daniel's Mighty Men and the non-fiction The Training Place of Mankind are books that I would like to read. I hope to have time to read them soon.

CZ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not entirely sure, but I've heard in a few places that they have archaeological finds from the Babylonian and Sumerian cultures that show a form of writing very similar to the Hebrew language (proto-Hebrew I guess is the fancy science-term). If I had to guess I'd say that was the official language pre-Tower of Babel.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. I think I will go with an early form of Hebrew. I also have to describe how people would interpret the writing after many generations post-flood and post Babel.

Any ideas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe it'd also be like us reading Old English or Latin, something along those lines. Maybe it could be so similar to the language of the time that it could still be pieced together?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Holy spirit could enable it?

Thanks David. I will factor that in, although in my story they will twist the words they interpret for their own purpose.

CZ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats an easy answer : Prehistoric King James :-) Archeologists found an early English tea cup near the site where the ark was built with the words " Help I`m drowning " written on a napkin . :-)

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Might consider Euskera, the heretofore untraceable language of the "Basques" in northern Spain. I once travelled from Pamplona (where Castilian is the predominant Spanish dialect) to San Sebastian, and it was quite an eye-opener to see road signs, etc. in the Euskera language--much less hear it. Here's an example:

[MEDIA=youtube]YLzQOsf7Mco[/MEDIA]

Of course, there have been some adaptation from the romance languages.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We don't really know, but I don't think it was Hebrew or any form of it. Even in Moses' time, the Hebrew that we know as Biblical Hebrew had not exist.

Besides, unless we go extremely literal on genealogy (and people in the old times are known to skip generations in genealogy), we don't really know how far back the flood was before Abraham. As far as biblical archaeology and dating go, we can be accurate only to the time around Abraham (this might have changed in recent years).

(I did take Biblical Hebrew and Greek.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it is safe to say that the original language is close to the one that God instilled within Adam at creation. Adam was able to name everything, and he and Eve conversed with God in the Garden, so there was at least a spoken language of some kind.

It makes sense that Hebrew, being the same language that God used to communicate with Moses, is tied in some way to the original creation language.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now